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GarlicRow

WHY IS B.C. GARLIC SO DARN GOOD!

Garlic has been part of the staple diet of people literally around the world for millennia – and we eat lots of it – around 80 billion pounds of home and commercial production, which works out to 10 pounds per person per year across the planet.  Over the centuries, many different types of garlic have naturally hybridized creating a plethora of varieties, each one having adapted to growing conditions and light.  Garlic, being an allium (related to leeks and onions) is light-sensitive, (phototropic) and the amount of light controls when it grows, and how long it takes to mature.

garlic family

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MARKET REPORT – JULY 29th, 2015

ALL IS GOOD IN AVOCADO AND BANANA LAND

Now you have more selections, with the first early apples now available – Early Gold and Sunrise to go with the last of the dessert apples, where we have good supply on crunchy Vista Bellas, and of course a wide range of the more popular models from South America.  All is good in avocado and banana land – nice to have no hiccups in that area.

You will have to watch your retails on a few more items this week as we all adjust to the much lower Canadian dollar – and that includes grocery (bulk) pricing.  We expect grain pricing to adjust again in the next few weeks as producers look at their own tussle with currency, and crop forecasts.  Bear in mind that there are drought-related problems on some cereal grains and legumes grown in northern BC and the Prairies, so just keep an eye open for more changes to come.  The CAD$ has dropped 11% since the beginning of the year.

CommunityFarmStore (5)

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WE HAVE MOVED!


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As of FRIDAY August 7th, ALL DELIVERIES will go to 880 Malkin Avenue VANCOUVER B.C. V6A 2K6:

MalkinMAP

 

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Hotshots – July 27th 2015

Dear Ones,

On Saturday night, the Dream Team took the seabus by storm, then Kristy’s apartment by storm, and then the seabus again, and then all of downtown by storm, because Charmaine Yam (picture below) is gettin’ hitched and we made her participate in the ritual which is assaulting her liver with fruity beverages and making her lip sync and shake her booty with her girlfriends before becoming a grown up for good.  She was down.

Charmaine

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Market Report – July 24th, 2015

RAIN IN THE LOWER MAINLAND

Yay!  Rain in the Lower Mainland – not a big deal normally, but after getting only 10% or less of our normal soggy Vancouver spring, it was very welcome to wake up to.  If nothing else our dusty cars are getting washed.  Temperatures have returned to ‘normal’ across the Interior regions, as have the Prairies, except Calgary of course, where, as Calgarians know, there is no normal, and quite a few dimpled cars and broken windshields are evidence of golf ball hail and even a tornado over the last couple of days.  We won’t bother you with another dismal climate and crop report after Wednesday’s doom and gloom.  Other than the challenges and losses those are accounting for, what growers are finding fascinating is how crops are acting so weirdly this year.

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MARKET REPORT – JULY 22, 2015

STAGE 4 DROUGHT PREVAILS IN SW BC

Much of SW BC has now been placed in Stage 4 drought.  This is the same Stage 4 ranking as California that they describe down there as severe drought.  Ours really got going in the fall of 2014, with progressively warmer temperatures above normal, and lower rainfall, to the point we are now in the same boat as California.  Boat probably isn’t the best descriptor, nor is up shit creek without a paddle.   The average house price in Vancouver is now over $2M as foreign money pours into the area, with investors assuming that Vancouver is a ‘safe haven’ for their money with ever increasing prices.  However, like people in California, their fancy landscaped lawns and gardens are now going un-watered and looking more desert like.  Their driveways are dusty, as are their cars.  But the impacts are far greater to the East in the Fraser Valley.  Crop after crop is being affected where so many growers are managing their water very carefully in fear of wells drying up – and most of the wells in the Fraser Valley are between 150 and 300 meters deep already.  Crops usually abundant are suffering – the extended heat has put pressure on many ground crops with lettuce, spinach and cilantro bolting before ready.

Timelapse

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